Violence Against Women

November 25, 2019 | Ann Keeling, Roopa Dhatt, Kim van Daalen Women in Global Health Demand an End to Violence Against All Women and Girls worldwide, including Female Health Workers. Today,  25 November, women and men all over the world mark the International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women. As in previous years, it is the start of 16 Days full Activism concluding on International Women’s Day on 10 December. This year’s theme is Orange the World: Generation Equality Stands Against Rape’. Violence against women and girls - in their homes and in public, at leisure and at work, in conflict and in peacetime - is one of the longest and deepest human rights abuses in human history

In response to the Nairobi Statment on ICPD25: ​Strengthening Women’s Leadership and Gender Equity i

Strengthening Women’s Leadership and Gender Equity in Global Health to Accelerate Implementation of ICPD Women in Global Health recognise the landmark ICPD adopted by 179 countries in Cairo Egypt 25 years ago in 1994. We recognise the impact of the Programme for the rights of women and girls, gender equality and therefore for sustainable development and all of humanity. We support the ambition expressed in the Nairobi Statement on ICPD25 ‘Accelerating the Promise’ to accelerate the full and effective implementation of commitments made at ICPD. We are a global network committed to gender transformative leadership in global health and gender parity in global health leadership. Gender equity wi

25 Years After Beijing: An Update on Access and Progress of Women Leaders in Global Health

Roopa Dhatt, Co-Founder and Executive Director at Women in Global Health and Jasmine Burton, Communications and Design Associate at Women in Global Health For the third consecutive year, the Women Leaders in Global Health (WLGH) conference was convened to “bring together established and emerging leaders from across sectors and cultures to work towards gender equity in health leadership and to improve health for all.”[1] The 2019 conference, held between November 9-10, boasted an impressive 1,000 participants from 100+ nationalities inspired by 100+ powerful speakers through 26 transformative sessions. Beyond the sheer volume of action-oriented content and impassioned registrants from around

25 Years After Beijing:  An Update on Access and Progress of Women Leaders in Global Health

For the third consecutive year, the Women Leaders in Global Health (WLGH) conference was convened to “bring together established and emerging leaders from across sectors and cultures to work towards gender equity in health leadership and to improve health for all.”[1] The 2019 conference, held between November 9-10, boasted an impressive 1,000 participants from 100+ nationalities inspired by 100+ powerful speakers through 26 transformative sessions. Beyond the sheer volume of action-oriented content and impassioned registrants from around the world, this year’s conference marked a new chapter for WLGH –the recognition that the conference vision (which is for women around the world to find th

The Gender Agenda at the Annual APHA 2019 Conference on "Creating the Healthiest Nation: For sc

Here is the summary of takeaways from the four sessions WGH hosted and participated in at APHA 2019 on women's leadership, women in politics, gender transformative leadership and an intervention on UHC and gender equality. 1. Mentorship: Many early-career women still find navigating global public health challenging. Therefore, we need to ensure that we continue to uplift each other especially young women. In addition, when we are the mentee we also need to be explicit to what we need from those mentors- be specific and unapologetic! We also heard that mentorship also needs to address some of the underpinning issues that at times are not so overt, like imposter syndrome. Let’s ensure when we

WHS 2019: Gender Equality within the Global Health Workforce

Introduction The health sector is a major employer of women globally. But although women comprise around 70% of the global health workforce they are largely clustered into lower status, lower paid sectors and jobs, with men holding the majority of senior roles. A large percentage of female health workers in low and middle-income countries particularly, work on insecure terms and conditions, without a supportive legal and social protection framework. Against the background of a predicted shortage of 18 million health workers needed to reach Universal Health Coverage, addressing gender inequality in the health workforce will enable better use of talent and deployment of health workers, reduce

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